Monday, 4 April 2016

Eggs, bread, pasta


So I read on the internet (duh!!) that it was possible to freeze eggs.  All you had to do was crack them into a muffin tin and freeze them individually.  Then when you defrost them all you had to do was simply whisk them together and use them in cakes or an omelette or something.  Nope, didn't work.  The yolks were brick hard on defrosting and couldn't be whisked.  6 eggs wasted but worth a shot.


Then my second disaster of the day.  I've made my GF bread once a week for 2 years now and didn't do anything different today.  When I went back to my loaf tin sitting in warm water, instead of finding risen dough I found it had overturned into the water and the contents floating.  *sigh*


I seriously considered not bothering with my planned eveing meal, just in case it got wrecked too. I chopped up 2 wrinkly peppers from Lidl that had been languishing in the fridge for a couple of weeks. I chopped up the last onion in the veg basket.  I sauted all the veg with a couple of garlic cloves then added 2 cartons of basics chopped tomatoes, a shake of Worcester sauce, a squeeze of tomato ketchup and a goodly sprinkle of mixed herbs.  It simmered for about 20 mins until thick and turned into a chunky tomato sauce.

I defrosted some yellow stickered sausages.


I skinned them and cut each one in half then rolled each half into a meatball shape.


After 20 mins in a hot oven they looked like this.


GF pasta, tomato sauce and meatballs.  Delicious! Phew!!

9 comments:

  1. I often freeze eggs as the chickens are sometimes too generous. I pop the yolks, whisk the egg up just to have an even yellow colour throughout, then pour into an empty yoghurt pot with a tiny drop of water. Two eggs per pot. Then, a day or two later when solidly frozen, I slip them out of the pot and store them in an ice cream box or food plassy bag. You absolutely must pop the yolks and whisk them up a bit, then all should be ok. Good for baking or scrambled eggs, quiche etc and if a bit thick, add a drop of water or milk.

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  2. I often freeze eggs as the chickens are sometimes too generous. I pop the yolks, whisk the egg up just to have an even yellow colour throughout, then pour into an empty yoghurt pot with a tiny drop of water. Two eggs per pot. Then, a day or two later when solidly frozen, I slip them out of the pot and store them in an ice cream box or food plassy bag. You absolutely must pop the yolks and whisk them up a bit, then all should be ok. Good for baking or scrambled eggs, quiche etc and if a bit thick, add a drop of water or milk.

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  3. Thanks for the tip, I will have another go when I've got a glut of eggs again

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  4. I had no idea you could freeze eggs. My hens are laying so we're giving eggs to all visitors that pop by at the moment.

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  5. I used to freeze eggs and found that I needed to whisk them up before freezing. I generally used them in scrambled egg/ omelette/ French toast after that :)

    I still regularly freeze whites (I've been using more yolks recently) and then use these up with a full egg in the same way :)
    x

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  6. I've always frozen eggs, having had poultry at home there was often a glut of them, even with a family of four and selling them by the gate. I beat them together in threes (that's the amount I use for a cake) and froze in plastic tubs or bags. They last up to about 6 months or so before they noticeably deteriorate. I'm going to have a go at drying them too in the dehydrator. Then there's pickled eggs.............. :)

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  7. I love pickled anything but have never tried a pickled egg! My Grandpa loved them :-)

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  8. I'm just about to pickle a batch of Pekin eggs, they are so small and neat that they look lovely sitting in their jars of vinegar. Great for adding to salads or for a nibbly snack during the day. It works just as well with big eggs ... you just need a big jar :-)

    Yes, if you want to freeze eggs they need to be popped in the case of just yolks and whisked in the case of a whole egg, but whites can just be poured into a tub or jar.

    At least your evening meal worked out fine - third time lucky :-)

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    Replies
    1. I have a big Sarson's pickling jar...

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